Happy Happy Happy ~ Guest Post by Pat Ruppel

Happy, Happy, Happy!” What makes you happy in a given day? I suppose there can be as many answers for that question as there are people, in all forms and feelings.

Life can be heavy at times, but it’s the light, fun, happy times we remember the most ― the people, places and events that warm our hearts and bring smiles to our faces.  It doesn’t take much and a lot is not required to make you happy. Most of the time, it’s a simple moment during an ordinary event that makes you the happiest.

One of those times happened for me many years ago, when I was little. It was a happy, funny event with my grandparents and cousins. We rode out to Grandpop’s boat to do some routine maintenance, while the tide was going out. It was time to copper paint the bottom of it, while tied up close to shore. Actually, it was my grandmother, who would be painting it, as my grandfather, with a history of respiratory problems, was frail and not as tough as he used to be.

Grandmom was a strong, big woman, about 5’10”, and Grandpop, with a smaller frame, was much thinner. They were a happy couple in their golden years ― similar to Ma and Pa Kettle.

grandma and granpop - compressed

She was equipped for this annual, summer event with her used, stubbed paintbrush and can of copper paint.  Decked out in her working house dress, old loafers and hair tied up in a bandana, we were ready to go!

When we arrived, the seven of us bounded out and wandered down the bank while the adults unloaded for the task at hand. We wanted to check for any fiddler crabs or periwinkle in the weeds along the shore. They’re a type of marine snail that lives in cone-shaped, whorled shells.

Things were set up and ready to go.  Grandmom wanted to get us settled before she started. She didn’t want to stop in the middle of painting to tend to us and wanted to be sure we would be secure and safe. So, she set out splitting us in two skiffs to tie to poles a little from shore where there was still tidewater. We would be contained and could occupy ourselves crabbing with a line and sinker with the water less than waist-high.

To maneuver and transfer us from one boat to the next, she put one foot in one skiff and the other foot in the second skiff alongside to steady them. In the midst of the shuffle with us transferring from one boat to the next, it was getting harder for Grandmom to hold the two boats together. They started to drift apart and her legs stretched as far as they could go.

She couldn’t hold on any longer and all of a sudden we saw her legs fly up in the air and the rest of her land with a thud in shallow water. It was a sight to behold seeing her, knees up, stuck in shallow mud and water. She started laughing and the rest of us chimed in until our sides hurt. Seeing the whole thing unfold from shore, Grandpop laughed so hard he almost fell in the water.

Needless to say, the copper painting would have to wait for one more day. Even now, as I tell this story, I have to chuckle as the scene plays back in my mind. They were happy, happy, happy times. How about you? Do you have any of those times you remember that bring up a laugh as you recall them? I’d love to hear them.

Pat from the ol’ kitchen table

Story is taken from Pat’s website at Plain Talk and Ordinary Wisdom

Diana writes “Many thanks to my friend and guest blogger Pat Ruppel, who writes delightful posts about life on her blog, (see details below) for sharing some precious early memories of her grandparents. Reading it was certainly a reminder of idyllic summer days at the coast in my own childhood. I hope you enjoyed it as much as I did.”

Pat’s Biography

Pat Ruppel is a blogger, writer and self-published author since 2007. She lives in the Colorado Rockies with her husband and pet dog, Abby.

Stop by and check out her website called “Plain Talk and Ordinary Wisdom, where she writes “kitchen table” stories to inspire and warm your heart.

For more information, you can also find her on other social networks at:

Facebook Page: http://www.facebook.com/PlainTalkAndOrdinaryWisdom

Twitter: https://twitter.com/pcrupp1928

LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/pub/pat-ruppel/0/834/6b7

Google+: https://plus.google.com/+Plaintalkandordinarywisdom/posts

Advertisements

About Diana Jackson

Author of 'The Healing Paths of Fife', Historical Romantic fiction ~ The Riduna Series set in 19th and early 20th Century a murder mystery ~ 'Murder, Now and Then' and two memoir. What links my books ~ history! Website:www.dianamaryjackson.co.uk Blog:www.dianamj.wordpress.com Riduna on Twitter and on Facebook too!
Gallery | This entry was posted in A Message, Late 20th Century, Life and Hope, Memoirs and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

25 Responses to Happy Happy Happy ~ Guest Post by Pat Ruppel

  1. Pat says:

    Thank you, Diana, for sharing my story. It’s an honor to be your guest. I’m glad you enjoyed it and that it rekindled some of the memories you had. I hope your readers enjoy it as much as I in writing it and the feeling of recapturing those happy, happy, happy moments long ago.

  2. Pingback: Guest Post on Selections of Reflections | Plain Talk and Ordinary Wisdom

  3. More than ‘happy’ to have you as my guest Pat 🙂

  4. What a great post – I too chuckled when I read it. It does sound like an idyllic time – and that photo is wonderful – they look like such happy people.

  5. I could see your Grandma with her legs akimbo. It also brought back memories of my ballet days where the teacher would stand behind those that couldn’t do the splits and with a hand on each shoulder she would apply downward pressure. The pain was immense and I would have given anything to have been able to fall, like your Grandma, into the water. Cheers Irene

    • Ouch Irene. Teachers have a lot to answer to. I remember we were put in the school hall for a ballet exam since the gym was busy. It had just been polished and we slid all over the place. Before you tube fortunately:-)

    • Pat says:

      Ouch — that would have hurt. No way out of that. I’m sorry you had to go through that, Irene.

  6. I LOVED this story Pat. It really made me laugh as I could see it all play out in my minds eye. What a great memory of your grandma. We often forget that some of the simpler things from our past are some of the best. Thanks for the reminder my friend. :-).

  7. Sherri says:

    What a lovely story Pat! Sorry I’m only just getting over here to read it, I’ve been catching up all day it seems! It is so wonderful that you have these memories of your grandparents, I can hear the laughter ringing out even now! Thank you for sharing this happy memory my friend 🙂
    Diana, thank you for this guest blog, Pat and I enjoy sharing our stories and memories across the sea and it’s lovely to see her over here too. I love how you invite other bloggers to share their stories here and connect with one another. So important! Wonderful post, thank you:-)

  8. Similar to you, Pat, I grew up in a large family, the youngest of nine, and money was always tight…however we have lots of funny stories and good memories to share when we all get together.

    • It’s a great way to share them on the internet too – to read writing from the heart like
      Pat’s and JT’s. Then there’s Cate who takes another person’s story and shares it too. Brilliant1

    • Pat says:

      In a family of nine, I’ll bet you do have a lot of stories, Bev — wow. I didn’t know that but can imagine given what it was like when my sister and I got together with our cousins at our grandparents. It’s fun to share, like Diana says, on the internet. Warms my heart and brings us together.

  9. Pingback: Guest Post on Finding Our Way Now | Plain Talk and Ordinary Wisdom

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s